Theodore Bathurst

Theodore Bathurst

Born
c. 1587
Hothorpe, Northamptonshire, England

Died
1652
Orton, England

Resting place
Orton Waterville. Huntingdonshire. England

Occupation
Latin poet and Church of England clergyman

Language
Latin and English

Nationality
English

Ethnicity
English

Citizenship
English

Education
BA

Alma mater
Pembroke College, University of Oxford

Period
Early modern

Genre
pastoral poetry

Notable works
Calendarium Pastorale

Theodore Bathurst (c. 1587–1652), also known as Theophilus Bathurstwas an English poet and translator who wrote in the Latin language. His most notable work is Calendarium Pastorale (English: The Pastoral Calendar).

Contents

1 Life
2 Works
3 References
4 External links

Life[edit]
Bathurst was descended from an ancient family of Hothorpe in Northamptonshire, and a relative of Dr Ralph Bathurst, the famous English physician, scholar, and divine. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1602, but graduated BA in 1606 from Pembroke College, the college to which Edmund Spenser belonged.[1]
Bathurst led a private life, and was a man of little ambition. So much the more, says one of his editors[who?], he deserved honour as he desired it less. [1]
Works[edit]
While at Pembroke, he executed his translation of Spenser’s ‘Shepherd’s Calendar’. He wrote the first two ecologues at Pembroke, which were dedicated to Thomas Neville, master of Trinity College, Cambridge. This translation had the honour of being highly commended by Sir Richard Fanshawe, who has himself left us specimens of Latin translations of English verse.[1]
Bathurst’s translation was edited first by Dr. William Dillingham, of Emmanuel College, and dedicated to Francis Lane. It was republished by John Ball, who, in his address to the reader, says he had much and long labour in procuring a copy of Bathurst’s work. It was then already rare among the booksellers.[1]
Ball’s edition is accompanied by the original eclogues on the opposite pages. He speaks of Bathurst, in the address above mentioned, as

‘poeta non minus ornatus quam gravis idem postea theologus, qui has eclogas ita Latinè vertit ut obscuris lucem, asperis lævitatem, atque omnibus fere nitorem et elegantiam fœneraverit. [1]

He added a Latin dissertation, De vita Spenseri et scriptis (English: The Life and Writings of Spenser; Lond. 8vo, no date and 1732). The precise title of Bathurst’s book is:

Calendarium Pastorale sive Eclogæ duodecim totidem anni mensibus accommo

Halil Jaçellari

Halil Jaçellari

Born
(1940-07-14)14 July 1940
Lushnje, Albania

Died
23 October 2009(2009-10-23) (aged 69)
Rome, Italy

Occupation
Writer, poet, translator

Language
Albanian

Genre
Novel, short story

Spouse
Afërdita Hasanbelliu

Children
Ilir Jaçellari

Halil Jaçellari (14 July 1940 – 23 October 2009) was an Albanian writer and translator.[1][2]
Published works[edit]

Mirë mëngjes njerëz (Good morning people), 1976, story collection
Hapat e tij (His footsteps), 1978, story collection
Nesër është e djelë (Tomorrow is Sunday), 1988, novel
Nuk është kjo dashuria (This is not love), 1996, story collection
Përralla nga Hans Christian Andersen (Tales – Hans Christian Andersen), 1996, translation
Nick Sniffle and Dr. Yeah, 1997, translation
Tregimet e Guy de Maupassant (Short story collection – Guy de Maupassant), 1999, translation
Tregime (Story collection), 2002
Sezoni pa dasma (Wedding-less season), 2005, novel
Humnera e mëdyshjes (Abyss of ambiguity), 2009, novel

References[edit]

^ “Nuk ka më “Nesër është e diel” nga Halil Jaçellari ~ Letërsi,ese,kritikë…”. fryma.info. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 
^ “Halil Jaçellari: Nji shënim, nji tregim dhe skeda e nji shkrimtari… | Radi and Radi”. radiandradi.com. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 

R-39 Rif

R-39

R-39

Type
Submarine-launched ballistic missile

Place of origin
Soviet Union

Service history

In service
1983–2004

Used by
Soviet Union / Russia

Production history

Designer
Makeyev Rocket Design Bureau

Manufacturer
Zlatoust Machine-Building Plant

Specifications

Weight
84 tonnes (185,000 lb)

Length
16.1 metres (53 ft)[1] (8.4 metres (28 ft) without warhead)

Diameter
2.4 metres (7.9 ft)[1]

Warhead
10[1]

Blast yield
100–200 kt each[1]

Engine
Three-stage Solid-fuel rocket[1]

Operational
range

8,300 kilometres (5,200 mi)[1]

Guidance
system

Astro-inertial guidance[2]

Submarine-based missiles: R-29, R-29Р, R-39, R-29РМ, CSS-NX-3, JL-2

The R-39 Rif (NATO reporting name: SS-NX-20 Sturgeon; bilateral arms control designation: RSM-52 ) was a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) that served with the Soviet Navy from its introduction in 1983 until 1991, after which it served with the Russian Navy until 2004. The missile had GRAU indices of 3M65, 3M20, and 3R65. It was carried on board Typhoon-class submarines.
An intercontinental missile, the R-39 had a three-stage solid-fuel boost design with a liquid-fuel post-boost unit carrying up to ten multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle warheads. Like other SLBMs the initial launch was powered by a gas generator in the bottom of the firing tube. During the missile’s passage through the water additional motors produce a gaseous wall around the missile, reducing hydrodynamic resistance.[citation needed] The launch system was designated “D-19”.

Contents

1 Development
2 Operators
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Development[edit]
Development work began at NII Mashinostroyeniya in 1971 and the design gained official approval in 1973. Initial test flights from 1979 found problems in the solid-fuel boost engines, over half of the early flights failed. Later tests aboard a modified Typhoon-class submarine were more successful and deployment began in May 1983, with 20 missiles in each submarine. At full deployment, 120 missiles were deployed with 1,200 total warheads.
Under the terms of the START I and START II treaties, from 1996 a number of R-39 missiles were destroyed. Throughout the 1990s, Typhoon class submarines and the R-39 missiles they carried were gradually withdrawn from service. All the missiles were decommissioned by 2004 and all the Typhoon class submarines have been r
연예인야동

It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It

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It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It

Studio album by Mac Dre

Released
November 20, 2001 (U.S.)

Genre
West Coast Hip Hop, Hyphy, Gangsta Rap

Label
Thizz

Mac Dre chronology

Mac Dre’s the Name
(2000)
It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It
(2001)
Thizzelle Washington
(2002)

It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It is a 2001 album by Hyphy Bay Area rapper Mac Dre.
“Mac Dre’s It’s Not What You Say…It’s How You Say It is another collection of hardcore rap from the underground. Guest stars include Richie Rich, Keak da Sneak, and several others. Fans of his previous work will probably enjoy this just fine, while new listeners can at least get a glimpse into the underground West Coast scene.” ~ Bradley Torreano, Allmusic
Track listing[edit]

“The Wolf Intro” (featuring Dubee)[1]
“Have You Eva” (featuring Dee and Little Bruce)[1]
“Bleezies-n-Heem”[1]
“Sex, Drugs, Rap?” (featuring Freak-O, Moe Jack and Nutt Briddle)[1]
“Livin’ It”[1]
“So Hard”[1]
“Iz Real” (featuring Messy Marv)[1]
“Mac Dammit & Friends” (featuring B.A., Keak da Sneak and PSD)[1]
“Always Inta Somethin'” (featuring Da’ Unda’ Dogg, J-Diggs and Sleep Dank)[1]
“Chevs and Fords” (featuring Little Bruce)[1]
“Take Yo’ Panties Off” (featuring Vital) Produced by Lev Berlak[1]
“Mac Dre’vious”[1]
“Hold Off” (featuring Richie Rich)[1]
“Bonus Track” (featuring Shouman and Suga Free)[1]

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n “Mac Dre – It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It”. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 

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Mac Dre

Studio albums

Young Black Brotha (1989)
Stupid Doo Doo Dumb (1998)
Rapper Gone Bad (1999)
Heart of a Gangsta, Mind of a Hustla, Tongue of a Pimp (2000)
Mac Dre’s the Name (2001)
It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It (2001)
Thizzelle Washington (2002)
Ronald Dregan: Dreganomics (2004)
The Genie of the Lamp (2004)
The Game Is Thick, Vol. 2 (2004)
Dre Day: July 5th 1970 (2008)

EPs

Young Black Brotha (EP) (1989)
Back N Da Hood (1992)

Collaboration albums

15 Years Deep (with Da’unda’dogg) (2005)
16 Wit Dre (with DJ Backside) (2006)
16 Wit Dre, Vol. 2 (with DJ Backside) (2006)
A Tale of Two Andres (with Andre Nickatina) (2008)

Gre
춘자넷

River Yox

River Yox channelised at Peasenhall.

The River Yox is a river in the English county of Suffolk. It flows from the west of Peasenhall through Sibton and Yoxford where it becomes the Minsmere River.[1] The Yox was originally fordable at Yoxford where a modern road bridge allows the A12 to cross the river.[2]
The river valley is largely drained and used as grassland with some arable use at Sibton. Some peat deposits are present. The valley has a narrow floodplain with water meadows and has largely been drained using a system of dykes.[2][3]
References[edit]

^ Storey N R (2013) The Little Book of Suffolk, History press. Available online, retrieved 2016-06-16.
^ a b Yoxford Conservation Area Appraisal Supplementary Planning Document, Suffolk Coastal District Council, June 2010. Retrieved 2012-11-01.
^ Valley meadows & fens, Suffolk Landscape Character Typology, Suffolk County Council. Retrieved 2012-11-01.

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Rivers and watercourses of Suffolk

River Alde
River Blyth
River Brett
Butley River
River Deben
River Dove
River Gipping
River Lark
River Little Ouse
Minsmere River
River Ore
Oulton Dyke
River Rat
River Stour
Stour Brook
River Waveney
River Yox

Coordinates: 52°15′53″N 1°31′14″E / 52.2646°N 1.5206°E / 52.2646; 1.5206

This Suffolk location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article related to a river in England is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Omega-9 fatty acid

For an explanation of n and numerical nomenclature (such as n−9 or 18:1), see Fatty acid § Nomenclature.

Types of fats in food

Unsaturated fat

Monounsaturated fat

ω−7
ω−9

Polyunsaturated fat

ω−3
ω−6

Trans fat

Saturated fat

Interesterified fat

See also

Fatty acid
Essential fatty acid

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Omega-9 fatty acids (ω−9 fatty acids or n−9 fatty acids) are a family of unsaturated fatty acids which have in common a final carbon–carbon double bond in the omega−9 position; that is, the ninth bond from the methyl end of the fatty acid.

Contents

1 Background
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

Background[edit]
Some omega−9 fatty acids are common components of animal fat and vegetable oil. Avocado oil is 70% Omega-9 fatty acid by percentage, giving it the highest smoke-point of all vegetable oils.[citation needed] Two omega−9 fatty acids important in industry are:

Oleic acid (18:1, n−9), which is a main component of olive oil, macadamia oil and other monounsaturated fats
Erucic acid (22:1, n−9), which is found in rapeseed, wallflower seed, and mustard seed. Rapeseed with high erucic acid content is grown for commercial use in paintings and coatings as a drying oil. Canola oil comes from a cultivar of the rapeseed plant that has been bred, or in some cases genetically modified, to contain very little erucic acid.

Unlike omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acid, omega−9 fatty acids are not classed as essential fatty acids (EFA). This is both because they can be created by the human body from unsaturated fat, and are therefore not essential in the diet, and because the lack of an omega−6 double bond keeps them from participating in the reactions that form the eicosanoids.
Under severe conditions of EFA deprivation, mammals will elongate and desaturate oleic acid to make mead acid, (20:3, n−9).[1] This has been documented to a lesser extent in one study following vegetarians and semi-vegetarians who followed diets without substantial sources of EFA.[2]

Omega−9 fatty acids

Common name
Lipid name
Chemical name

oleic acid
18:1 (n−9)
(Z)-octadec-9-enoic acid

elaidic acid
18:1 (n−9)
(E)-octadec-9-enoic acid

gondoic acid
20:1 (n−9)
(Z)-eicos-11-enoic acid

mead acid
20:3 (n−9)
(5Z,8Z,11Z)-eicosa-5,8,11-trienoic acid

erucic acid
22:1 (n−9)
(Z)-docos-13-enoic acid

nervonic acid
24:1 (n−9)
(Z)-tetracos-15-enoic acid

See also[edit]

Polyunsaturated fatty acid
인천오피

Sabine Getty

Sabine Getty

Born
Sabine Ghanem
Geneva, Switzerland

Other names
Sabine G

Alma mater
Gemological Institute of America

Occupation
Jewelry designer, socialite

Years active
2012–present

Spouse(s)
Joseph Getty

Relatives
see Getty family

Website
www.sabineg.com

Sabine Getty (née Ghanem) is a Swiss born Lebanese-Egyptian[1] jewelry designer and founder of the jewelry line Sabine G.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Sabine G.
3 Personal life
4 References

Early life[edit]
Ghanem was born in Switzerland and grew up living in Geneva, Beirut and the South of France. Her father, who is Lebanese, is a financier. Her mother, who is from Egypt, is an interior decorator. Ghanem was educated in Geneva and speaks English, French and Arabic. She studied theatre and opera before switching to design.[2] She graduated from the Gemological Institute of America in 2012 and moved to London.
Sabine G.[edit]
The jewelry line “Sabine G.” is based in London and is sold at Bergdorf Goodman in New York, Maxfield in Los Angeles, Browns in London and Montaigne Market in Paris as well as stores in Monaco, Vienna, and Beirut.[3][4][5]
Personal life[edit]
Ghanem married billionaire heir Joseph Getty, son of Mark Getty and grandson of Sir John Paul Getty, in a Catholic ceremony at the Basilica of the Twelve Apostles in Rome on May 30, 2015.[6] Her dress was a custom made haute couture gown by Schiaparelli with a hooded cloak designed by Lesage and Charlotte Olympia heels. Wedding guests included Princess Elisabeth von Thurn und Taxis, Princess Beatrice of York, Ginevra Elkann, Charlotte Olympia Dellal, Pierre Casiraghi, Julia Restoin Roitfeld, and Donna Bianca Brandolini d’Adda.[7][8] A party celebrating the wedding celebrations was hosted at the Palazzo Taverna. The wedding reception was held at the Castle Odescalchi.[9][10]
References[edit]

^ http://www.wmagazine.com/people/insiders/2015/03/sabine-ghanem-jewelry-designer/
^ http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/columns/olivia-lidbury/TMG11643350/Sabine-G-and-Jossph-Getty-married-the-most-glamorous-wedding-of-the-year.html
^ http://thedivineaddiction.com/2013/05/17/people-we-love-sabine-ghanem/
^ http://www.thecoveteur.com/the-girl-sabine-g-jewelry-designer/
^ http://www.sabineg.com/about
^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm7077932/bio
^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3103852/At-no-one-talking-Beatrice-s-hat-Billionaire-Getty-marries-Rome-bride-quite-outlandish-dress.html
^ http://www.vogue.com/13287042/sabi
강남오피

Omar Mussa

This article needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (February 2015)

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2015)

Omar Mussa

Personal information

Full name
Omar Mbanza Mussa Rukundo

Date of birth
(1980-11-18) November 18, 1980 (age 36)

Place of birth
Bujumbura, Burundi

Height
1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)

Playing position
Striker

Club information

Current team

SK Wilrijk

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1997
Saint-Louisienne

2000–2001
Berkenbos VV

2001–2003
Royal Antwerp
68
(13)

2004
Al-Wakrah

2005
Patro Eisden

2007
K.R.C. Mechelen

2007–????
SK Wilrijk

National team‡

Burundi
8
(6)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 13:40, 14 November 2011 (UTC).
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 13:40, 14 November 2011 (UTC)

Omar Mbanza Mussa Rukundo (born 18 November 1980) is a Burundian international footballer, who has played for most of his professional career in Belgium, he plays for Belgian team SK Wilrijk in the 1ste provinciale Antwerpen league.
Career[edit]
Most of his club football has been played in Belgium, with spells at Royal Antwerp, K. Patro Eisden Maasmechelen and K.R.C. Mechelen. He also played briefly in Qatar for Al-Wakrah Sports Club during 2004.
Personal[edit]
Mussa was born in Bujumbura, the capital of Burundi, to a Muslim family and was the son of a butcher. His family fled the country during violent clashes between Hutu and Tutsi factions and moved to The Congo, and from there on to Belgium.
References[edit]

“Omar Mussa”. Weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
“Racing Mechelen (Bel)”. footballtransfers.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
“Interview Omar Mussa”. antwerpsupporter.be (in Dutch). Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
“Omar Mussa”. The Official Royal Antwerp Football Club Archive. Retrieved 14 November 2011. 

This biographical article related to Burundian association football is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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인천오피

ShopKeep

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2014)

ShopKeep

Smarter Business

Type

Private

Industry
Point of sale

Founded
2008 (2008)

Headquarters
New York, NY

Area served

United States, Canada

Key people

Jason Richelson (Co-Founder)
David Olk (Co-Founder)
Michael DeSimone (CEO)

Number of employees

200+

Website
www.shopkeep.com

ShopKeep is a cloud-based iPad point of sale (POS) system headquartered in New York, NY. Founded in 2008, its POS system is used by more than 23,000 small businesses[1] in the United States and Canada, most of which are retail shops, coffee shops, restaurants, and bars. The system allows merchants to ring up sales, print or email receipts, pop a cash drawer, accept credit cards and print remotely to the kitchen right from the iPad. The web-based BackOffice allows inventory, employee, and customer management, and analytics and reporting. The smartphone dashboard app allows merchants to view real-time store sales remotely.
History[edit]
ShopKeep was co-founded[2][3][4] by Jason Richelson,[5] co-founder of several retail stores in Brooklyn and New York City, and David Olk,[6][7][8][9][10] former Director of M&A at IAC. When Jason’s point of sale system in his stores broke down, he decided that there had to be a simpler, smarter solution for small businesses. He developed ShopKeep POS as a cloud-based point of sale system to allow a merchants to access data even when they are not in the store.[11] He also developed it from the eyes of a retailer and used his expertise[citation needed] to create a user interface that is intuitive to the merchants and the cashiers that stand behind the counter. Jason hired Bill Walton as the original system architect and engineer to build the ShopKeep Platform in October 2008.
In August 2011, the first iPad version of ShopKeep was released in the App Store. As of July 2015, ShopKeep has raised over $97 million in funding.[12]
See also[edit]

Point of sale display
Point of sale
Cyber security standards
List of cyber attack threat trends
Cyber electronic warfare
Malware

References[edit]

^ http://paymentweek.com/2015-7-30-shopkeep-announces-60-million-series-d-round-funding-7864/
^ “ShopKeep Raises $60M – [Jcount.com]”. 2015-07-29. Retrieved 2016-08-23. 
^ “Cloud Computing Revolutionizes the Customer-Retailer Transaction”. 2012-04-2
오피뷰

2008–09 EuroCup Women

2008–09 EuroCup Women

League
EuroCup Women

Sport
Basketball

Regular season

Final

Champions
Galatasaray SK

  Runners-up
Cras Basket Taranto

EuroCup Women seasons

← 2007–08
2009–10 →

The EuroCup Women is an international basketball club competition for women’s clubs throughout Europe. The 2008-2009 season involved 58 competing teams from 28 different countries. The Turkish team Galatasaray SK became the champion, defeating Cras Basket Taranto in the finals. Trailing by 12 points after the first leg in Italy, Galatasaray returned to Istanbul and won 82-61 for a 137-128 victory on aggregate.[1]

Groups[edit]
Group A[edit]

Home

Away
Score

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski

MBK Ružomberok
82 – 76

Dynamo Moscow

Municipal Târgoviste
95 – 59

MBK Ružomberok

Dynamo Moscow
44 – 104

Municipal Târgoviste

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski
70 – 67

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski

Dynamo Moscow
64 – 93

Municipal Târgoviste

MBK Ružomberok
73 – 53

MBK Ružomberok

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski
91 – 81

Municipal Târgoviste

Dynamo Moscow
50 – 58

Dynamo Moscow

MBK Ružomberok
88 – 41

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski

Municipal Târgoviste
77 – 74

MBK Ružomberok

Municipal Târgoviste
75 – 69

Dynamo Moscow

AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski
88 – 58

Group A

Team
Pld
W
L
PF
PA
Points

1.
Dynamo Moscow
6
6
0
523
316
12

2.
Municipal MCM Târgovişte
6
2
4
395
425
8

3.
AZS PWSZ Gorzów Wielkopolski
6
2
4
429
489
8

4.
MBK Ružomberok
6
2
4
380
497
8

Group B[edit]

Home

Away
Score

Dynamo Kursk

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe
88 – 74

Bnot Hasharon

Challes-les-Eaux Basket
69 – 81

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe

Bnot Hasharon
83 – 73

Challes-les-Eaux Basket

Dynamo Kursk
73 – 68

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe

Challes-les-Eaux Basket
59 – 65

Bnot Hasharon

Dynamo Kursk
63 – 102

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe

Dynamo Kursk
70 – 64

Challes-les-Eaux Basket

Bnot Hasharon
66 – 72

Dynamo Kursk

Challes-les-Eaux Basket
69 – 54

Bnot Hasharon

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe
81 – 91

Challes-les-Eaux Basket

CSS-LMK Sfântu Gheorghe
77 – 63

Dynamo Kursk

Bnot Hasharon
77 – 50

Group B

Team
Pld
W
L
PF
PA
Points

1.
Dynamo Kursk
6
4
2
468
384
10

2.
Challes-les-Eaux Basket
6
4
2
416
400
10

3.
LMK BC Sepsi Sfântu Gheorghe
6
3
3
440
448
9

4.
Bnot Hasharon
6
1
5
408
500
7

Group C[edit]

Home

Away
Score

Rivas Ecopolis Mad