Hyperventilation

Not to be confused with hypoventilation or Hyperventilation syndrome.

Hyperventilation

Classification and external resources

Specialty
Pulmonology

ICD-10
R06.4

ICD-9-CM
786.01

MedlinePlus
003071

Patient UK
Hyperventilation

MeSH
D006985

[edit on Wikidata]

Hyperventilation (also called overbreathing) occurs when the rate and quantity of alveolar ventilation of carbon dioxide exceeds the body’s production of carbon dioxide.[1][2][3] A person may regularly hyperventilate, a condition called hyperventilation syndrome.[4]
When alveolar ventilation is excessive, more carbon dioxide will be removed from the blood stream than the body can produce. This causes the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood stream to fall and produces a state known as hypocapnia. The body normally attempts to compensate for this metabolically. If excess ventilation cannot be compensated metabolically, it will lead to a rise in blood pH. This rise in blood pH is known as respiratory alkalosis. When hyperventilation leads to respiratory alkalosis, it may cause a number of physical symptoms: dizziness, tingling in the lips, hands or feet, headache, weakness, fainting and seizures. In extreme cases it can cause carpopedal spasms (flapping and contraction of the hands and feet).[3][5]
There are factors that initiate hyperventilation and others can sustain it; for example, physiological stress or a feeling of anxiety can initiate it; anxiety may also sustain it.[2]
Other factors that initiate or sustain hyperventilation include reduced air pressure at high altitudes, head injury, stroke, respiratory disorders such as asthma and pneumonia, cardiovascular problems such as pulmonary embolisms, anemia, and adverse reactions to certain drugs.[1][3]
Hyperventilation can also be mechanically produced in people on respirators and can also be brought about voluntarily, by taking many deep breaths in rapid succession.[3]
References[edit]

^ a b Guyton, Arthur C.; Hall, John E. (2005). Textbook of medical physiology (11th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. p. 397. ISBN 0-7216-0240-1. 
^ a b Longo, Dan .; et al. (2012). Harrison’s principles of internal medicine. (18th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 2185. ISBN 978-0071748896.  CS1 maint: Explicit use of et al. (link)
^ a b c d Brandis, Kerry (30 Aug 2015). “6.2 Respiratory Alkalosis – Causes”. Acid-base Physiology (Reviewed in 2006 by the American Thoracic Society). 
^ “eMedicine – Hypervent
일산오피

Fabulous (Charlie Gracie song)

“Fabulous” is a 1957 song by Charlie Gracie. It is his second and last appearance on the Billboard Top 40 besides the chart-topping “Butterfly”. It made it to number 16 on US Billboard chart. The song was popular in the United Kingdom and internationally reaching number 6 on the British Singles Chart.[1][2][3][4][5]
Covers[edit]
The song has been subject to many covers, including a 2013 cover by Cliff Richard in his tribute album The Fabulous Rock ‘n’ Roll Songbook
References[edit]

^ “For the Love of Charlie”. amazon.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “Charlie Gracie – Fabulous! An Intimate Portrait of a Rock Pioneer DVD”. cduniverse.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “Charlie Gracie”. mtv.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “charliegracie.com”. charliegracie.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “charlie gracie-fabulous 45”. bing.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 

Nik Wheeler

Nik Wheeler

Born
1939

Nationality
British

Occupation
Photographer

Spouse(s)
Pamela Bellwood (1984-present)

Nik Wheeler (1939- ) is a British-born photographer, known for taking what for years was the only known photograph of Carlos the Jackal.[1] He began his career as a photojournalist during the Vietnam War.
Wheeler was born in Hitchin, England in 1939. He was a war photographer for United Press International in Vietnam, and he photographed the fall of Saigon for Newsweek. Wheeler had moved to Beirut, Lebanon in the early 1970s and freelanced throughout the Middle East for a number of European magazines. He is the co-founder of Traveler’s Companion Guides, based in California.[2][3]
Wheeler is married to actress Pamela Bellwood.
References[edit]

^ Ryon, Ruth (2000-07-27). “Hall-of-Famer Is Giving Up His Home Court Advantage”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-05-21. 
^ Catherine Leroy, Under Fire: Great Photographers and Writers in Vietnam (2005)
^ Return to the Marshes: Life with the Marsh Arabs of Iraq (with Gavin Young)(1977)

This article about a British photographer is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Puinahua District

Puinahua

District

Country
 Peru

Region
Loreto

Province
Requena

Founded
July 2, 1943

Capital
Bretaña

Government

 • Mayor
Arnulfo Tafur Navarro

Area

 • Total
5,946.83 km2 (2,296.08 sq mi)

Elevation
118 m (387 ft)

Population (2005 census)

 • Total
5,857

 • Density
0.98/km2 (2.6/sq mi)

Time zone
PET (UTC-5)

UBIGEO
160506

Puinahua District is one of eleven districts in the province of Requena in Peru.[1]
References[edit]

^ (Spanish) Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática. Banco de Información Distrital. Retrieved April 11, 2008.

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Districts of Loreto Region
Peru

Alto Amazonas

Balsa Puerto
Jeberos
Lagunas
Santa Cruz
Teniente Cesar Lopez Rojas
Yurimaguas

Datem del Marañón

Andoas
Barranca
Cahuapanas
Manseriche
Morona
Pastaza

Loreto

Nauta
Parinari
Tigre
Trompeteros
Urarinas

Mariscal Ramón Castilla

Pebas
Ramón Castilla
San Pablo
Yavari

Maynas

Alto Nanay
Belén
Fernando Lores
Indiana
Iquitos
Las Amazonas
Mazán
Napo
Punchana
San Juan Bautista
Torres Causana

Putumayo

Putumayo
Rosa Panduro
Teniente Manuel Clavero
Yaguas

Requena

Alto Tapiche
Capelo
Emilio San Martín
Jenaro Herrera
Maquia
Puinahua
Requena
Saquena
Soplin
Tapiche
Yaquerana

Ucayali

Contamana
Inahuaya
Padre Marquez
Pampa Hermosa
Sarayacu
Vargas Guerra

This Loreto Region geography article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Coordinates: 5°15′58″S 74°50′38″W / 5.2660°S 74.8438°W / -5.2660; -74.8438

List of Members of the Canadian House of Commons (G)

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Lists of past and present Members of the Canadian House of Commons

Parliament

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
32nd
33rd
34th
35th
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
41st
42nd

Surname

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Contents

1 Ga
2 Ge
3 Gi
4 Gl
5 Go
6 Gr
7 Gu

Ga[edit]

Beryl Gaffney b. 1930 first elected in 1988 as Liberal member for Nepean, Ontario.
Alfonso Gagliano b. 1942 first elected in 1984 as Liberal member for Saint-Léonard—Anjou, Quebec.
Jean Alfred Gagné b. 1842 first elected in 1882 as Conservative member for Chicoutimi—Saguenay, Quebec.
Christiane Gagnon b. 1948 first elected in 1993 as Bloc Québécois member for Québec, Quebec.
Marcel Gagnon b. 1936 first elected in 2000 as Bloc Québécois member for Champlain, Quebec.
Onésime Gagnon b. 1888 first elected in 1930 as Conservative member for Dorchester, Quebec.
Patrick Gagnon b. 1962 first elected in 1993 as Liberal member for Bonaventure—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec.
Paul Gagnon b. 1937 first elected in 1984 as Progressive Conservative member for Calgary North, Alberta.
Paul-Edmond Gagnon b. 1909 first elected in 1945 as Independent member for Chicoutimi, Quebec.
Philippe Gagnon b. 1909 first elected in 1962 as Social Credit member for Rivière-du-Loup—Témiscouata, Quebec.
Sébastien Gagnon b. 1973 first elected in 2002 as Bloc Québécois member for Lac-Saint-Jean—Saguenay, Quebec.
Daniel Galbraith b. 1813 first elected in 1872 as Liberal member for Lanark North, Ontario.
Cheryl Gallant b. 1960 first elected in 2000 as Canadian Alliance member for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, Ontario.
Roger Gallaway b. 1948 first elected in 1993 as Liberal member for Sarnia—Lambton, Ontario.
Daniel Gallery b. 1859 first elected in 1900 as Liberal member for St. Anne, Quebec.
William Alfred Galliher b. 1860 first elected in 1900 as Liberal member for Yale—Cariboo, British Columbia.
Alexander Tilloch Galt b. 1817 first elected in 1867 as Liberal-Conservative member for Town of Sherbrooke, Quebec.
John Albert Gamble b. 1933 first elected in 1979 as Progressive Conservative member for York North, Ontario.
Arthur D. Ganong b. 1877 first elected in 1930 as Conservative member for Charlotte, New Brunswick.
Gilbert White Ganong b. 1851 first elected in 1896 as Liberal-Conservative member for Charlotte, New Brunswick.
Alain Ga

We Bombed in New Haven

We Bombed in New Haven is a 1967 play by Joseph Heller. An anti-war black comedy, it is thematically linked in part to Heller’s famous novel Catch-22.[1]
The play opened on Broadway at the Ambassador Theatre on October 16, 1968 and closed on December 29, 1968 after 85 performances.[2]
The play is heavily metatheatrical, being not only staged at but also set at the Ambassador Theatre, the actors playing actors appearing in a play at the Ambassador. This play-within-a-play concerns a strategic bombing squadron; the squadron commander frequently steps out of character to reassure the audience that they are only watching a play.[3]
This conceit is carried to the point where the actors themselves exhibit confusion over whether they really are actors playing airmen, or actual airmen. For instance, in the second act, Henderson (played by Ron Leibman) is scheduled to be killed – he knows this, being familiar with the script, and is not worried; but then later, a corporal is killed on a mission and Henderson is unable to find him offstage. Henderson worries that the corporal really has been killed, and that perhaps the “play” is reality.[4]
This “phantasmagoric world in which actors might not know where the grease paint ended and the blood began”,[4] where the audience is led to believe in both levels of reality as the borders blend and blur in manner reminiscent of the works of Luigi Pirandello,[5] is used by Heller to satirize and excoriate the moral blindness that leads people to treat war as spectacle, equating the real death and suffering of war with the deaths of actors in war movies.[4]
New York Times theatre critic Clive Barnes gave the play a mixed review (“I would call it a bad play any good playwright should be proud to have written, and any good audience fascinated to see”);[4] the New York Post was more enthusiastic (“An exceptional quality of imagination that is at once comic, bitter and moving, and it is immensely effective in dramatic terms”).[6]
The title of the play is ironic with a double meaning. In 1967, plays frequently opened in New Haven, Connecticut as a shakedown run before moving to Broadway (perhaps via Boston or Philadelphia), and “bombed in New Haven” would describe a play that was found there to be too flawed to make it to Broadway.[7] And the airmen do literally bomb in New Haven[8] (as well as other targets such as Minnesota and “Constantinople”) in the course of the play, reason for these seemingly absurd targeting orders from th