Cameron Meredith

Cameron Meredith

No. 81 Chicago Bears

Position:
Wide receiver

Personal information

Date of birth:
(1992-09-21) September 21, 1992 (age 24)

Place of birth:
Westchester, Illinois

Height:
6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)

Weight:
207 lb (94 kg)

Career information

High school:
Westchester (IL) St. Joseph

College:
Illinois State

Undrafted:
2015

Career history

Chicago Bears (2015–present)

Roster status:
Active

Career NFL statistics as of Week 17, 2016

Receptions:
77

Receiving yards:
1,008

Receiving touchdowns:
4

Player stats at NFL.com

Cameron Meredith (born September 21, 1992) is an American football wide receiver for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He was signed by the Bears as an undrafted free agent in 2015.[1] He played college football at Illinois State.

Contents

1 Early years
2 College career
3 Professional career

3.1 2015
3.2 2016

4 References
5 External links

Early years[edit]
Meredith was a three-year letter winner in football, playing at quarterback for St. Joseph (Westchester, Illinois). His parents are Lonnie and Tonjua Meredith.[2]
College career[edit]
Meredith attended Illinois State, he redshirted his first season and then spent the 2011 and 2012 seasons as a backup quarterback. In 2013, he transitioned to Wide receiver and led the team in receptions in both 2013 and 2014. In 2014, he led ISU with 66 receptions for 1,061 yards receiving, with nine touchdowns in 15 games.[2] Being a redshirt senior with no eligibility remaining he entered the 2015 NFL Draft, but he was not invited to the NFL Combine. He impressed scouts at the Northwestern pro day enough to earn several free agent offers.[1]
Professional career[edit]
During the NFL Draft, Meredith was the victim of a prank call, a person pretending to be New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick stating that the team would be taking him with the 97th overall pick; instead, the Patriots took Geneo Grissom and Meredith went undrafted.[3]
Meredith signed with the Chicago Bears as an undrafted free agent.[4]
2015[edit]
On September 20, 2015, Meredith recorded his first NFL reception against the Arizona Cardinals.[5] On October 11, Meredith caught a season-high four receptions for a season-high 52 yards against the Kansas City Chiefs.[6] At the end of the 2015 season, Meredith finished with 11 receptions for 120 yards.[7]
2016[edit]
Meredith began his second season as the Bears’ fifth wide rece

FLWOR

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The programming language XQuery defines FLWOR (pronounced ‘flower’) as an expression that supports iteration and binding of variables to intermediate results. FLWOR is an acronym: FOR, LET, WHERE, ORDER BY, RETURN.[1] FLWOR is loosely analogous to SQL’s SELECT-FROM-WHERE and can be used to provide join-like functionality to XML documents.

for creates a sequence of nodes
let binds a sequence to a variable
where filters the nodes on a boolean expression
order by sorts the nodes
return gets evaluated once for every node

Contents

1 Example
2 Example using MS SQL Server
3 References
4 External links

Example[edit]

for $d in doc(“depts.xml”)//deptno
let $e := doc(“emps.xml”)//employee[deptno = $d]
where count($e) >= 10
order by avg($e/salary) descending
return
<big-dept>
{ $d,
<headcount>{count($e)}</headcount>,
<avgsal>{avg($e/salary)}</avgsal>
}
</big-dept>

First column of the XQuery request shows the for, let, where, order by and return keywords of the FLWOR paradigm. In plain English, this could be read as “Get all departments that have more than ten employees, order these departments by decreasing average salary, and return a report of department numbers, head counts and average salary in each big department”. The result could look like:

<big-dept>
<deptno>17</deptno>
<headcount>25</headcount>

Vince Cross

Vince Cross

Personal information

Full name
Vince Cross

Date of birth
(1919-02-22)22 February 1919

Date of death
7 June 1994(1994-06-07) (aged 75)

Height / weight
184 cm / 89 kg

Playing career1

Years
Club
Games (Goals)

1943–45
North Melbourne
4 (0)

1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1945.

Vince Cross (22 February 1919 – 7 June 1994) was an Australian rules footballer who played with North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).[1]
Notes[edit]

^ Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim (2014). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers: every AFL/VFL player since 1897 (10th ed.). Seaford, Victoria: BAS Publishing. p. 194. ISBN 978-1-921496-32-5. 

External links[edit]

Vince Cross’s statistics from AFL Tables
Vince Cross’s profile from AustralianFootball.com

This Australian rules football biography of a person born in the 1910s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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한국야동

Currumbin, Queensland

“Currumbin” redirects here. For the Queensland electoral division, see Electoral district of Currumbin.

Currumbin
Gold Coast, Queensland

The Gold Coast skyline from Currumbin Beach

Population
2,785 (2011 census)[1]

Postcode(s)
4223

LGA(s)
City of Gold Coast

State electorate(s)
Currumbin

Federal Division(s)
McPherson [2]

Suburbs around Currumbin:

Elanora
Palm Beach
Pacific Ocean

Currumbin Waters
Currumbin
Pacific Ocean

Currumbin Waters
Currumbin Waters
Tugun

Currumbin is a coastal suburb in the Gold Coast region of Queensland, Australia. At the 2011 Census, Currumbin had a population of 2,785.[1] From 1947 onwards, the iconic Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary has been welcoming tourists.

Contents

1 History
2 Demographics
3 Heritage listings
4 Geography
5 Events
6 Sport and recreation
7 See also
8 References
9 External links

History[edit]
Samuel William Grey was the first European to acquire land in the area.[3] In 1904, Isle, Love and Co advertised the first subdivisions in Currumbin [4] The first hotel was built by Wallace McDonald Nicoll in 1910 on Duringan Street overlooking the mouth of the Currumbin Creek.[5] During this period tourism and industry significantly increased in the beach side and valley areas of Currumbin. Many of the houses at Currumbin date from the period of later subdivisions in the 1920s. The area also contains a number of fibro beach houses. Since then later development has occurred including some high rise backing onto the hillside at Pacific Parade.

Currumbin Beach, 1938

Generally the area contains more natural vegetation than other areas of the coast due in part to the difficulty of building on the steep hillsides and in part to the presence of the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary – a long-standing icon and landmark at the Gold Coast. The Sanctuary comprises a substantial area of land on both sides of the highway adjacent to Flat Rock Creek.
In 2013, Currumbin was named Australia’s cleanest beach. At an award ceremony at Coogee Beach WA the national organisation Keep Australia Beautiful crowned Currumbin with the prestigious title. Currumbin was commended in particular for its excellence in community involvement and partnerships.[6]
Demographics[edit]

Tomewin Street, 2015

In the 2011 census, Currumbin recorded a population of 2,785 people, 50.9% female and 49.1% male.[1] The median age of the Currumbin population was 41 years, 4 years above the national median of 37. 73.7% of p

Rahlstedt Cemetery

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2013)

Rahlstedter Friedhof

The large marble crucifix and graves of the pastors

Details

Established
1829

Location
Hamburg

Country
Germany

Type
Protestant cemetery

Size
8.5 ha

Number of graves
19.000

Website
Official website

The Lutheran Rahlstedt Cemetery (German: Rahlstedter Friedhof) is a church-operated historic burial ground in Hamburg, Germany. The cemetery is owned by the Evangelical Lutheran parish church of Old Rahlstedt, Hamburg.

Contents

1 History and description
2 Selected notable burials
3 Gallery
4 References and external links

History and description[edit]
The cemetery was established in 1829. It has a size of 8.5 hectares and it contains 19.000 graves. The oldest preserved tombstone dates back to 1837, belonging to a woman named Sophie Dorothea Freerks. There is a separate plot adjacent to the cemetery chapel reserved for the pastors. A large marble crucifix dominates the area since 1964, which was originally on the altar of the Old Rahlstedt parish church and later transferred to the cemetery.[1]
Selected notable burials[edit]
Notable people buried here include:

Detlev von Liliencron (1844–1909), German lyric poet and novelist from Kiel

Gallery[edit]

References and external links[edit]

Hamburg portal

Official website (German)

^ http://www.rahlstedterfriedhof.de/html/friedhof_rahlstedt.html

Coordinates: 53°35′33″N 10°09′18″E / 53.59250°N 10.15500°E / 53.59250; 10.15500

This article about a Hamburg building or structure is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article about a cemetery in Germany is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Hyperventilation

Not to be confused with hypoventilation or Hyperventilation syndrome.

Hyperventilation

Classification and external resources

Specialty
Pulmonology

ICD-10
R06.4

ICD-9-CM
786.01

MedlinePlus
003071

Patient UK
Hyperventilation

MeSH
D006985

[edit on Wikidata]

Hyperventilation (also called overbreathing) occurs when the rate and quantity of alveolar ventilation of carbon dioxide exceeds the body’s production of carbon dioxide.[1][2][3] A person may regularly hyperventilate, a condition called hyperventilation syndrome.[4]
When alveolar ventilation is excessive, more carbon dioxide will be removed from the blood stream than the body can produce. This causes the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood stream to fall and produces a state known as hypocapnia. The body normally attempts to compensate for this metabolically. If excess ventilation cannot be compensated metabolically, it will lead to a rise in blood pH. This rise in blood pH is known as respiratory alkalosis. When hyperventilation leads to respiratory alkalosis, it may cause a number of physical symptoms: dizziness, tingling in the lips, hands or feet, headache, weakness, fainting and seizures. In extreme cases it can cause carpopedal spasms (flapping and contraction of the hands and feet).[3][5]
There are factors that initiate hyperventilation and others can sustain it; for example, physiological stress or a feeling of anxiety can initiate it; anxiety may also sustain it.[2]
Other factors that initiate or sustain hyperventilation include reduced air pressure at high altitudes, head injury, stroke, respiratory disorders such as asthma and pneumonia, cardiovascular problems such as pulmonary embolisms, anemia, and adverse reactions to certain drugs.[1][3]
Hyperventilation can also be mechanically produced in people on respirators and can also be brought about voluntarily, by taking many deep breaths in rapid succession.[3]
References[edit]

^ a b Guyton, Arthur C.; Hall, John E. (2005). Textbook of medical physiology (11th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. p. 397. ISBN 0-7216-0240-1. 
^ a b Longo, Dan .; et al. (2012). Harrison’s principles of internal medicine. (18th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 2185. ISBN 978-0071748896.  CS1 maint: Explicit use of et al. (link)
^ a b c d Brandis, Kerry (30 Aug 2015). “6.2 Respiratory Alkalosis – Causes”. Acid-base Physiology (Reviewed in 2006 by the American Thoracic Society). 
^ “eMedicine – Hypervent
일산오피

Fabulous (Charlie Gracie song)

“Fabulous” is a 1957 song by Charlie Gracie. It is his second and last appearance on the Billboard Top 40 besides the chart-topping “Butterfly”. It made it to number 16 on US Billboard chart. The song was popular in the United Kingdom and internationally reaching number 6 on the British Singles Chart.[1][2][3][4][5]
Covers[edit]
The song has been subject to many covers, including a 2013 cover by Cliff Richard in his tribute album The Fabulous Rock ‘n’ Roll Songbook
References[edit]

^ “For the Love of Charlie”. amazon.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “Charlie Gracie – Fabulous! An Intimate Portrait of a Rock Pioneer DVD”. cduniverse.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “Charlie Gracie”. mtv.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “charliegracie.com”. charliegracie.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
^ “charlie gracie-fabulous 45”. bing.com. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 

Nik Wheeler

Nik Wheeler

Born
1939

Nationality
British

Occupation
Photographer

Spouse(s)
Pamela Bellwood (1984-present)

Nik Wheeler (1939- ) is a British-born photographer, known for taking what for years was the only known photograph of Carlos the Jackal.[1] He began his career as a photojournalist during the Vietnam War.
Wheeler was born in Hitchin, England in 1939. He was a war photographer for United Press International in Vietnam, and he photographed the fall of Saigon for Newsweek. Wheeler had moved to Beirut, Lebanon in the early 1970s and freelanced throughout the Middle East for a number of European magazines. He is the co-founder of Traveler’s Companion Guides, based in California.[2][3]
Wheeler is married to actress Pamela Bellwood.
References[edit]

^ Ryon, Ruth (2000-07-27). “Hall-of-Famer Is Giving Up His Home Court Advantage”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-05-21. 
^ Catherine Leroy, Under Fire: Great Photographers and Writers in Vietnam (2005)
^ Return to the Marshes: Life with the Marsh Arabs of Iraq (with Gavin Young)(1977)

This article about a British photographer is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Puinahua District

Puinahua

District

Country
 Peru

Region
Loreto

Province
Requena

Founded
July 2, 1943

Capital
Bretaña

Government

 • Mayor
Arnulfo Tafur Navarro

Area

 • Total
5,946.83 km2 (2,296.08 sq mi)

Elevation
118 m (387 ft)

Population (2005 census)

 • Total
5,857

 • Density
0.98/km2 (2.6/sq mi)

Time zone
PET (UTC-5)

UBIGEO
160506

Puinahua District is one of eleven districts in the province of Requena in Peru.[1]
References[edit]

^ (Spanish) Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática. Banco de Información Distrital. Retrieved April 11, 2008.

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Districts of Loreto Region
Peru

Alto Amazonas

Balsa Puerto
Jeberos
Lagunas
Santa Cruz
Teniente Cesar Lopez Rojas
Yurimaguas

Datem del Marañón

Andoas
Barranca
Cahuapanas
Manseriche
Morona
Pastaza

Loreto

Nauta
Parinari
Tigre
Trompeteros
Urarinas

Mariscal Ramón Castilla

Pebas
Ramón Castilla
San Pablo
Yavari

Maynas

Alto Nanay
Belén
Fernando Lores
Indiana
Iquitos
Las Amazonas
Mazán
Napo
Punchana
San Juan Bautista
Torres Causana

Putumayo

Putumayo
Rosa Panduro
Teniente Manuel Clavero
Yaguas

Requena

Alto Tapiche
Capelo
Emilio San Martín
Jenaro Herrera
Maquia
Puinahua
Requena
Saquena
Soplin
Tapiche
Yaquerana

Ucayali

Contamana
Inahuaya
Padre Marquez
Pampa Hermosa
Sarayacu
Vargas Guerra

This Loreto Region geography article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Coordinates: 5°15′58″S 74°50′38″W / 5.2660°S 74.8438°W / -5.2660; -74.8438

List of Members of the Canadian House of Commons (G)

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Lists of past and present Members of the Canadian House of Commons

Parliament

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
32nd
33rd
34th
35th
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
41st
42nd

Surname

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Contents

1 Ga
2 Ge
3 Gi
4 Gl
5 Go
6 Gr
7 Gu

Ga[edit]

Beryl Gaffney b. 1930 first elected in 1988 as Liberal member for Nepean, Ontario.
Alfonso Gagliano b. 1942 first elected in 1984 as Liberal member for Saint-Léonard—Anjou, Quebec.
Jean Alfred Gagné b. 1842 first elected in 1882 as Conservative member for Chicoutimi—Saguenay, Quebec.
Christiane Gagnon b. 1948 first elected in 1993 as Bloc Québécois member for Québec, Quebec.
Marcel Gagnon b. 1936 first elected in 2000 as Bloc Québécois member for Champlain, Quebec.
Onésime Gagnon b. 1888 first elected in 1930 as Conservative member for Dorchester, Quebec.
Patrick Gagnon b. 1962 first elected in 1993 as Liberal member for Bonaventure—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec.
Paul Gagnon b. 1937 first elected in 1984 as Progressive Conservative member for Calgary North, Alberta.
Paul-Edmond Gagnon b. 1909 first elected in 1945 as Independent member for Chicoutimi, Quebec.
Philippe Gagnon b. 1909 first elected in 1962 as Social Credit member for Rivière-du-Loup—Témiscouata, Quebec.
Sébastien Gagnon b. 1973 first elected in 2002 as Bloc Québécois member for Lac-Saint-Jean—Saguenay, Quebec.
Daniel Galbraith b. 1813 first elected in 1872 as Liberal member for Lanark North, Ontario.
Cheryl Gallant b. 1960 first elected in 2000 as Canadian Alliance member for Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, Ontario.
Roger Gallaway b. 1948 first elected in 1993 as Liberal member for Sarnia—Lambton, Ontario.
Daniel Gallery b. 1859 first elected in 1900 as Liberal member for St. Anne, Quebec.
William Alfred Galliher b. 1860 first elected in 1900 as Liberal member for Yale—Cariboo, British Columbia.
Alexander Tilloch Galt b. 1817 first elected in 1867 as Liberal-Conservative member for Town of Sherbrooke, Quebec.
John Albert Gamble b. 1933 first elected in 1979 as Progressive Conservative member for York North, Ontario.
Arthur D. Ganong b. 1877 first elected in 1930 as Conservative member for Charlotte, New Brunswick.
Gilbert White Ganong b. 1851 first elected in 1896 as Liberal-Conservative member for Charlotte, New Brunswick.
Alain Ga