Single room occupancy

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An abandoned Single Room Hotel (Hugo Hotel) at 6th and Howard in San Francisco, California

Single room occupancy (more commonly SRO, sometimes called a single resident occupancy) is a form of housing in which one or two people are housed in individual rooms (sometimes two rooms, or two rooms with a bathroom or half bathroom) within a multiple-tenant building. The term is primarily used in Canadian and American cities. SRO tenants typically share bathrooms and/or kitchens, while some SRO rooms may include kitchenettes, bathrooms, or half-baths. Although many are former hotels, SROs are primarily rented as permanent residences.
Single room occupancies are often a form of affordable housing for low-income and formerly homeless individuals.[1]

Contents

1 History
2 Uses
3 Conditions
4 Incidents

4.1 Class action lawsuits

5 See also
6 References
7 Further reading
8 External links

History[edit]

The refurbished single room Ambassador Hotel at 55 Mason Street in San Francisco.

The term originated in New York City, probably in the 1930s (the Oxford English Dictionary provides an earliest citation of 1941), but the institutions date back at least fifty years before the nickname was applied to them. SROs exist in many American cities, and are most common in larger cities. In many cases, the buildings themselves were formerly hotels in or near a city’s central business district. Many of these buildings were built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
The United States saw a decrease in single room occupancy housing during the period of 1960s and 1970s urban decay. For example, in Chicago 81% of the SRO housing stock disappeared between 1960 and 1980.[2]
Many SRO buildings face strong development pressure for conversion to more profitable uses. Some cities have regulated the conversion of SROs to other uses in order to prevent landlords from forcibly evicting SRO tenants. San Francisco passed an SRO Hotel Conversion Ordinance in 1980, which restricts the conversion of SRO hotels to tourist use. SROs are prominent in the Tenderloin, Mission District and Chinatown communities.
In San Francisco, the city may take over particularly squalid SROs, and renovate them for the disadvantaged. Landlords w
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Butter-and-eggs

Butter-and-eggs may refer to:

Butter-and-eggs, one of the common names for Linaria vulgaris, a species of toadflax
Butter and eggs, one of the common names for Triphysaria eriantha, a species in Orobanchaceae, the broomrape family.
Butter and Egg Days Parade, held annually in Petaluma, California

See also[edit]

Butter (disambiguation)

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Butter-and-eggs.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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Glyn Harman

Glyn Harman (born 2 November 1956) is a British mathematician working in analytic number theory.[1] One of his major interests is prime number theory. He is best known for results on gaps between primes and the greatest prime factor of p + a, as well as his lower bound for the number of Carmichael numbers up to X. His monograph entitled Prime-detecting Sieves was published by Princeton University Press. He has also written a book entitled Metric Number Theory, and he has in addition contributed to the field of Diophantine approximation.[2]
Harman retired at the end of 2013 from being a professor at Royal Holloway, University of London.[1] Previously he was a professor at Cardiff University.
Harman is married, and has three sons,[1] and used to live in Wokingham, Berkshire before moving to Harrow, Middlesex/Greater London.
References[edit]

^ a b c “Professor Glyn Harman | Department Of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London”. ma.rhul.ac.uk. 2013. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
^ “Glyn Harman – Publications – Research – Royal Holloway, University of London”. pure.rhul.ac.uk. 2013. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 

External links[edit]

Home page of Glyn Harman

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 81715247
ISNI: 0000 0001 1476 0455
SUDOC: 15422023X
BNF: cb16775928q (data)
MGP: 67486

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Rahlstedt Cemetery

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (February 2013)

Rahlstedter Friedhof

The large marble crucifix and graves of the pastors

Details

Established
1829

Location
Hamburg

Country
Germany

Type
Protestant cemetery

Size
8.5 ha

Number of graves
19.000

Website
Official website

The Lutheran Rahlstedt Cemetery (German: Rahlstedter Friedhof) is a church-operated historic burial ground in Hamburg, Germany. The cemetery is owned by the Evangelical Lutheran parish church of Old Rahlstedt, Hamburg.

Contents

1 History and description
2 Selected notable burials
3 Gallery
4 References and external links

History and description[edit]
The cemetery was established in 1829. It has a size of 8.5 hectares and it contains 19.000 graves. The oldest preserved tombstone dates back to 1837, belonging to a woman named Sophie Dorothea Freerks. There is a separate plot adjacent to the cemetery chapel reserved for the pastors. A large marble crucifix dominates the area since 1964, which was originally on the altar of the Old Rahlstedt parish church and later transferred to the cemetery.[1]
Selected notable burials[edit]
Notable people buried here include:

Detlev von Liliencron (1844–1909), German lyric poet and novelist from Kiel

Gallery[edit]

References and external links[edit]

Hamburg portal

Official website (German)

^ http://www.rahlstedterfriedhof.de/html/friedhof_rahlstedt.html

Coordinates: 53°35′33″N 10°09′18″E / 53.59250°N 10.15500°E / 53.59250; 10.15500

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Spraycan Art

Spraycan Art is the first book that documented the initial stages of the worldwide spread of New York City Subway graffiti style and subculture. Authored by Henry Chalfant and James Prigoff and published by Thames & Hudson on September 1, 1987.[1] The photographs are primarily of walls rather than subway cars, and features the work of Mode 2, 3D, Bando, Lee, Chico, Tracy 168, Buda, Shame, Blade and many others.
Spraycan Art followed the release of Subway Art (also published by Thames & Hudson), authored by Henry Chalfant and Martha Cooper.
References[edit]

^ Spraycan Art Publishing Date: September 1, 1987

http://www.amazon.com/Spraycan-Art-Street-Graphics/dp/050027469X/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

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Hyperventilation

Not to be confused with hypoventilation or Hyperventilation syndrome.

Hyperventilation

Classification and external resources

Specialty
Pulmonology

ICD-10
R06.4

ICD-9-CM
786.01

MedlinePlus
003071

Patient UK
Hyperventilation

MeSH
D006985

[edit on Wikidata]

Hyperventilation (also called overbreathing) occurs when the rate and quantity of alveolar ventilation of carbon dioxide exceeds the body’s production of carbon dioxide.[1][2][3] A person may regularly hyperventilate, a condition called hyperventilation syndrome.[4]
When alveolar ventilation is excessive, more carbon dioxide will be removed from the blood stream than the body can produce. This causes the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood stream to fall and produces a state known as hypocapnia. The body normally attempts to compensate for this metabolically. If excess ventilation cannot be compensated metabolically, it will lead to a rise in blood pH. This rise in blood pH is known as respiratory alkalosis. When hyperventilation leads to respiratory alkalosis, it may cause a number of physical symptoms: dizziness, tingling in the lips, hands or feet, headache, weakness, fainting and seizures. In extreme cases it can cause carpopedal spasms (flapping and contraction of the hands and feet).[3][5]
There are factors that initiate hyperventilation and others can sustain it; for example, physiological stress or a feeling of anxiety can initiate it; anxiety may also sustain it.[2]
Other factors that initiate or sustain hyperventilation include reduced air pressure at high altitudes, head injury, stroke, respiratory disorders such as asthma and pneumonia, cardiovascular problems such as pulmonary embolisms, anemia, and adverse reactions to certain drugs.[1][3]
Hyperventilation can also be mechanically produced in people on respirators and can also be brought about voluntarily, by taking many deep breaths in rapid succession.[3]
References[edit]

^ a b Guyton, Arthur C.; Hall, John E. (2005). Textbook of medical physiology (11th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. p. 397. ISBN 0-7216-0240-1. 
^ a b Longo, Dan .; et al. (2012). Harrison’s principles of internal medicine. (18th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 2185. ISBN 978-0071748896.  CS1 maint: Explicit use of et al. (link)
^ a b c d Brandis, Kerry (30 Aug 2015). “6.2 Respiratory Alkalosis – Causes”. Acid-base Physiology (Reviewed in 2006 by the American Thoracic Society). 
^ “eMedicine – Hypervent
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River Yox

River Yox channelised at Peasenhall.

The River Yox is a river in the English county of Suffolk. It flows from the west of Peasenhall through Sibton and Yoxford where it becomes the Minsmere River.[1] The Yox was originally fordable at Yoxford where a modern road bridge allows the A12 to cross the river.[2]
The river valley is largely drained and used as grassland with some arable use at Sibton. Some peat deposits are present. The valley has a narrow floodplain with water meadows and has largely been drained using a system of dykes.[2][3]
References[edit]

^ Storey N R (2013) The Little Book of Suffolk, History press. Available online, retrieved 2016-06-16.
^ a b Yoxford Conservation Area Appraisal Supplementary Planning Document, Suffolk Coastal District Council, June 2010. Retrieved 2012-11-01.
^ Valley meadows & fens, Suffolk Landscape Character Typology, Suffolk County Council. Retrieved 2012-11-01.

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Rivers and watercourses of Suffolk

River Alde
River Blyth
River Brett
Butley River
River Deben
River Dove
River Gipping
River Lark
River Little Ouse
Minsmere River
River Ore
Oulton Dyke
River Rat
River Stour
Stour Brook
River Waveney
River Yox

Coordinates: 52°15′53″N 1°31′14″E / 52.2646°N 1.5206°E / 52.2646; 1.5206

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David Reesor

The Hon.
David Reesor

Senator for King’s, Ontario

In office
October 23, 1867 – January 1, 1901

Appointed by
Royal Proclamation

Personal details

Born
(1823-01-18)January 18, 1823
Markham, Upper Canada

Died
April 27, 1902(1902-04-27) (aged 79)
Rosedale, Ontario

Political party
Liberal

Spouse(s)
Emily McDougall m. 1847

Children
William David Reesor, Marion Reesor, Jessie Reesor, Annette Reesor and Nellie Reesor

Occupation
politician, publisher

Religion
Methodist

David Reesor (January 18, 1823 – April 28, 1902) was an Ontario businessman and political figure. He was a Liberal member of the Senate of Canada for King’s division from 1867 to 1901.
He was born in Reesorville (later the Village of Markham), Upper Canada in 1823 to parents Abraham Reesor (1755–1823) and Anna Dettwiler (d. 1857), descended from Pennsylvania Dutch Mennonite immigrants who first settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. David was the nephew of Abraham Stouffer, founder of Stouffville, and of Peter Reesor, co-founder of Reesorville (later Markham) and Cedar Valley. In 1848, he married Emily McDougall, who was the sister of politician William McDougall. Reesor was editor of the Markham Economist. He was also a magistrate and notary public, reeve of Markham, Ontario (1851, 1856–57 and 1859–1860) and served as warden for York and Peel counties. Though Reesor came from a pacifist Mennonite background, he became a lieutenant-colonel in the local militia. He was elected to the Legislative Council of the Province of Canada for King’s division in 1860 and served until Confederation, when he was named to the Senate. During the debates preceding Confederation, Reesor supported an elected Senate. He resigned in 1901.
He died at Rosedale in north Toronto in 1902 and buried with wife at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto. His home at 166 Main Street North in Markham (built 1876) still stands. Senator Reesor Drive in Markham is named in his honour.[1]
Reesor married Emily McDougall in 1847, who was sister to Father of Conferation William McDougall.
References[edit]

^ http://www.thestar.com/life/2013/05/30/street_names_senator_reesors_dr.html

External links[edit]

David Reesor – Parliament of Canada biography
A Cyclopedia of Canadian Biography. Being chiefly men of the time, ed. G.M. Rose (Toronto, 1888).
The Canadian parliamentary companion, ed. C.H. Mackintosh & J.A. Gemmill (Ottawa, 1889).
The Canadian biographical dictionary and portrai

France 3 Alpes

France 3 Alpes

Launched
1968

Owned by
France Télévisions

Slogan
“Toujours plus près, pour mieux se comprendre”

Country
 France

Broadcast area
 Rhône-Alpes

Headquarters
La Tronche

Formerly called
ORTF Rhône-Alpes (1968-1975)
FR3 Rhône-Alpes Auvergne (1975-1992)
France 3 Rhône-Alpes Auvergne (1992-2010)

Website
France 3 Alpes

France 3 Alpes is one France 3’s regional broadcasting services to people in the Rhône-Alpes region. It was launched as ORTF Rhône-Alpes in 1968. It is headquartered in La Tronche. The service is also one of 2 services to be broadcast to people living in the region, the other being France 3 Rhône-Alpes, which is broadcast from Lyon. France 3 Alpes also produces news content. It is also received in Switzerland.[1]

Contents

1 Presenters
2 Programming
3 References
4 External links

Presenters[edit]

Delphine Aldebert
Jean-Christophe Solari

Programming[edit]

19/20 Alpes[2]
19/20 Grenoble
Soir 3 Alpes
12/13 Alpes[3]
La voix est libre
Midi Pile
Alpes Express

References[edit]

^ [1]
^ [2]
^ [3]

External links[edit]

Official site (French)

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6ter
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Chérie 25
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franceinfo:

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Ferdinand Helias

Ferdinand Benoit Marie Guislain Helias d’Huddeghem (born in Ghent, Belgium, 3 August 1796; died in Taos, Cole County, Missouri, 11 August 1874) was a Roman Catholic clergyman who worked in Missouri.
Biography[edit]
He belonged to a noble Belgian family, and his brother was prime minister of that kingdom for several years. Ferdinand entered the Society of Jesus in 1817, and at the close of his novitiate was appointed professor and prefect of studies in the high school of Brig, Switzerland. After several years, he was summoned to Rome to act as assistant secretary to the father general of the order, and subsequently was assigned to the American mission.
Helias arrived in the United States, 19 May 1833, and was immediately appointed master of novices in the Jesuit college, Frederick, Maryland. Shortly afterward he organized at St. Louis, Missouri, a German congregation, which, through his labors, became one of the largest in the country. He also built St. Joseph’s Church for the use of the German Catholics. In 1838 he organized the first German congregation outside of St. Louis at Washington, Franklin County, Missouri, and founded a church.
From Washington he made his way through the wilderness, with compass in hand, to Westphalia, Osage County, where he organized a church and founded a mission. In course of time, he organized congregations and built churches in Rich Fountain in the same county, in St. Thomas and Jefferson City, in Taos, in Booneville, Cooper County, and in several other places. His missionary labors extended to Westport and Independence, the extreme western settlements of the state.
For the last 24 years of his life, he was principally stationed at Taos, near Jefferson City. Notwithstanding his advanced age, he continued to perform his functions until the day before his death.
Notes[edit]

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

References[edit]

“The Mission of Central Missouri”. St. Louis Catholic historical review. Catholic Historical Society of Saint Louis: 159–176. 1920. 
 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John, eds. (1892). “Helias d’Humonde, Ferdinand Mary”. Appletons’ Cyclopædia of American Biography. New York: D. Appleton. 

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