FLWOR

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)

The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia’s general notability guideline. Please help to establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted.
Find sources: ”FLWOR” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR · free images (August 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

(Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The programming language XQuery defines FLWOR (pronounced ‘flower’) as an expression that supports iteration and binding of variables to intermediate results. FLWOR is an acronym: FOR, LET, WHERE, ORDER BY, RETURN.[1] FLWOR is loosely analogous to SQL’s SELECT-FROM-WHERE and can be used to provide join-like functionality to XML documents.

for creates a sequence of nodes
let binds a sequence to a variable
where filters the nodes on a boolean expression
order by sorts the nodes
return gets evaluated once for every node

Contents

1 Example
2 Example using MS SQL Server
3 References
4 External links

Example[edit]

for $d in doc(“depts.xml”)//deptno
let $e := doc(“emps.xml”)//employee[deptno = $d]
where count($e) >= 10
order by avg($e/salary) descending
return
<big-dept>
{ $d,
<headcount>{count($e)}</headcount>,
<avgsal>{avg($e/salary)}</avgsal>
}
</big-dept>

First column of the XQuery request shows the for, let, where, order by and return keywords of the FLWOR paradigm. In plain English, this could be read as “Get all departments that have more than ten employees, order these departments by decreasing average salary, and return a report of department numbers, head counts and average salary in each big department”. The result could look like:

<big-dept>
<deptno>17</deptno>
<headcount>25</headcount>

Theodore Bathurst

Theodore Bathurst

Born
c. 1587
Hothorpe, Northamptonshire, England

Died
1652
Orton, England

Resting place
Orton Waterville. Huntingdonshire. England

Occupation
Latin poet and Church of England clergyman

Language
Latin and English

Nationality
English

Ethnicity
English

Citizenship
English

Education
BA

Alma mater
Pembroke College, University of Oxford

Period
Early modern

Genre
pastoral poetry

Notable works
Calendarium Pastorale

Theodore Bathurst (c. 1587–1652), also known as Theophilus Bathurstwas an English poet and translator who wrote in the Latin language. His most notable work is Calendarium Pastorale (English: The Pastoral Calendar).

Contents

1 Life
2 Works
3 References
4 External links

Life[edit]
Bathurst was descended from an ancient family of Hothorpe in Northamptonshire, and a relative of Dr Ralph Bathurst, the famous English physician, scholar, and divine. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1602, but graduated BA in 1606 from Pembroke College, the college to which Edmund Spenser belonged.[1]
Bathurst led a private life, and was a man of little ambition. So much the more, says one of his editors[who?], he deserved honour as he desired it less. [1]
Works[edit]
While at Pembroke, he executed his translation of Spenser’s ‘Shepherd’s Calendar’. He wrote the first two ecologues at Pembroke, which were dedicated to Thomas Neville, master of Trinity College, Cambridge. This translation had the honour of being highly commended by Sir Richard Fanshawe, who has himself left us specimens of Latin translations of English verse.[1]
Bathurst’s translation was edited first by Dr. William Dillingham, of Emmanuel College, and dedicated to Francis Lane. It was republished by John Ball, who, in his address to the reader, says he had much and long labour in procuring a copy of Bathurst’s work. It was then already rare among the booksellers.[1]
Ball’s edition is accompanied by the original eclogues on the opposite pages. He speaks of Bathurst, in the address above mentioned, as

‘poeta non minus ornatus quam gravis idem postea theologus, qui has eclogas ita Latinè vertit ut obscuris lucem, asperis lævitatem, atque omnibus fere nitorem et elegantiam fœneraverit. [1]

He added a Latin dissertation, De vita Spenseri et scriptis (English: The Life and Writings of Spenser; Lond. 8vo, no date and 1732). The precise title of Bathurst’s book is:

Calendarium Pastorale sive Eclogæ duodecim totidem anni mensibus accommo

1981 Tel Aviv Open – Singles

Singles

1981 Tel Aviv Open

Champion
Mel Purcell

Runner-up
Per Hjertquist

Final score
6–1, 6–1

Events

Singles
Doubles

← 1980 ·
Tel Aviv Open
· 1982 →

Main article: 1981 Tel Aviv Open
Harold Solomon was the defending champion, but did not participate this year.
Mel Purcell won the tournament, beating Per Hjertquist in the final, 6–1, 6–1.

Contents

1 Seeds
2 Draw

2.1 Key
2.2 Finals
2.3 Top Half
2.4 Bottom Half

3 References

Seeds[edit]

Mel Purcell (Champion)
Shlomo Glickstein (Quarterfinals)
Vincent Van Patten (Quarterfinals)
Ilie Năstase (Second Round)
Per Hjertquist (Final)
Steve Krulevitz (Semifinals)
Matt Doyle (First Round)
Klaus Eberhard (Semifinals)

Draw[edit]
Key[edit]

Q = Qualifier
WC = Wild Card
LL = Lucky Loser
Alt = Alternate
SE = Special Exempt
PR = Protected Ranking
w/o = Walkover
r = Retired
d = Defaulted

Finals[edit]

 
Semifinals

Final

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1
  Mel Purcell
6
1
6
 

6
  Steve Krulevitz
1
6
3
 

 
1
  Mel Purcell
6
6
 

 
5
  Per Hjertquist
1
1
 

5
  Per Hjertquist
5
6
6

 
8
  Klaus Eberhard
7
3
3
 

Top Half[edit]

First Round

Second Round

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

1
M Purcell
1
7
6

 
J Feaver
6
5
2

1
M Purcell
6
6
 

 
B Pils
2
6
6

 
Bernhard Pils
2
0
 

 
G Holroyd
6
4
2

1
M Purcell
6
6
 

 
D Siegler
1
3
 

 
Eric Wilborts
4
3
 

 
Eric Wilborts
6
6
 

 
Eric Wilborts
7
6
 

 
R Reininger
6
6
 

 
R Reininger
6
2
 

7
M Doyle
4
4
 

1
M Purcell
6
1
6

3
V Van Patten
6
6
 

6
S Krulevitz
1
6
3

 
C Mayotte
3
2
 

3
V Van Patten
6
6
 

 
Bobby Webb
2
3
 

Q
H Theissen
2
4
 

Q
H Theissen
6
6
 

3
V Van Patten
5
3
 

 
V Winitsky
6
7
 

6
S Krulevitz
7
6
 

 
J-L Haillet
1
5
 

 
V Winitsky
6
1
4

Q
D Schneider
6
5
6

6
S Krulevitz
4
6
6

6
S Krulevitz
2
7
7

Bottom Half[edit]

First Round

Second Round

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

5
P Hjertquist
6
6
 

Q
Frank Puncec
4

Field Head

Field Head

Field Head

Field Head shown within Leicestershire

OS grid reference
SK4909

District

Hinckley and Bosworth

Shire county

Leicestershire

Region

East Midlands

Country
England

Sovereign state
United Kingdom

Post town
MARKFIELD

Postcode district
LE67

Dialling code
01530

Police
Leicestershire

Fire
Leicestershire

Ambulance
East Midlands

EU Parliament
East Midlands

List of places
UK
England
LeicestershireCoordinates: 52°40′51″N 1°16′09″W / 52.680943°N 1.269251°W / 52.680943; -1.269251

Field Head is a small settlement along the A511 on the edge of the Charnwood Forest in the Hinckley and Bosworth district of Leicestershire, England. It is mainly a ribbon development along the A511 from the top of Bradgate Hill to the Coach and Horses public house. However, in the 1960s development of an area South of the A511 effectively doubled the size of the settlement. It is part of the civil parish of Groby. The population is included in the civil parish of Ratby.
The settlement is most notable for the Fieldhead Hotel, which was originally a farmhouse built around 1672. It is a small hotel and restaurant,[1] within the parish boundaries of Newtown Linford.
References[edit]

^ The Fieldhead Hotel

External links[edit]

Field Head at Leicestershirevillages.com

Copt Oak
Ulverscroft
Woodhouse Eaves

Markfield

Newtown Linford

  Field Head  

Thornton
Ratby
Groby

This Leicestershire location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

중국야동

Short Trips: The Ghosts of Christmas

Short Trips: The Ghosts of Christmas

Author
Cavan Scott & Mark Wright

Series
Doctor Who book:
Big Finish Short Trips

Release number

22

Publisher
Big Finish Productions

Publication date

December 2007

ISBN
1-84435-270-6

Preceded by
Short Trips: Snapshots

Followed by
Short Trips: Defining Patterns

Short Trips: The Ghosts of Christmas is a Big Finish original anthology edited by Cavan Scott and Mark Wright and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The collection features stories set at Christmas in the past, present and future. It is the third Christmas anthology released under the Short Trips title.
Stories[edit]

Title
Author
Doctor
Featuring

Faithful Friends: Part 1
Cavan Scott & Mark Wright
3rd
Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart

But Once a Year
Colin Harvey
7th
Ace

For the Man Who Has Everything
Dan Abnett
8th

Tell Me You Love Me
Scott Matthewman
1st
Ian, Barbara & Susan

The Cutty Wren
Ann Kelly
2nd
Jamie & Victoria

Do You Dream in Colour
Gary Russell
None
Ben & Polly

The Nobility of Faith
Jonathan Clements
4th

24 Crawford Street
Ian Farrington
7th
Mel

The Sommerton Fetch
Peter Anghelides
3rd
Jo

Faithful Friends: Part 2
Cavan Scott & Mark Wright
None
Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart

Dear Great Uncle Peter
Neil Corry
4th
Leela

Do You Believe in the Krampus?
Xanna Eve Chown
5th
Turlough

They Fell
Scott Handcock
8th
Charley

The Christmas Presence
Simon Barnard & Paul Morris
2nd
Jamie

Snowman in Manhattan
John Binns
1st
Vicki & Steven

The Crackers
Richard Salter
6th
Evelyn

Jigsaw
Michael Abberton
3rd
Jo

Dr Cadabra
Trevor Baxendale
6th
Mel

Far Away in a Manger
Iain McLaughlin
5th
Peri & Erimem

All Snug in Their Beds
Scott Allan Woodard
4th
Romana & K9

Decorative Purposes
Eddie Robson
8th
Lucie

The Stars Our Contamination
Steven Savile
6th
Peri

Keeping it Real
Joseph Lidster
5th
Tegan

Christmas Everyday
Mark Magrs
7th

Faithful Friends – Part 3
Cavan Scott & Mark Wright
8th
Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart & Charley Pollard

Notes[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (July 2010)

External links[edit]

Big Finish Productions – Short Trips: The Ghosts of Christmas

This Doctor Who–related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

한국야동

Halil Jaçellari

Halil Jaçellari

Born
(1940-07-14)14 July 1940
Lushnje, Albania

Died
23 October 2009(2009-10-23) (aged 69)
Rome, Italy

Occupation
Writer, poet, translator

Language
Albanian

Genre
Novel, short story

Spouse
Afërdita Hasanbelliu

Children
Ilir Jaçellari

Halil Jaçellari (14 July 1940 – 23 October 2009) was an Albanian writer and translator.[1][2]
Published works[edit]

Mirë mëngjes njerëz (Good morning people), 1976, story collection
Hapat e tij (His footsteps), 1978, story collection
Nesër është e djelë (Tomorrow is Sunday), 1988, novel
Nuk është kjo dashuria (This is not love), 1996, story collection
Përralla nga Hans Christian Andersen (Tales – Hans Christian Andersen), 1996, translation
Nick Sniffle and Dr. Yeah, 1997, translation
Tregimet e Guy de Maupassant (Short story collection – Guy de Maupassant), 1999, translation
Tregime (Story collection), 2002
Sezoni pa dasma (Wedding-less season), 2005, novel
Humnera e mëdyshjes (Abyss of ambiguity), 2009, novel

References[edit]

^ “Nuk ka më “Nesër është e diel” nga Halil Jaçellari ~ Letërsi,ese,kritikë…”. fryma.info. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 
^ “Halil Jaçellari: Nji shënim, nji tregim dhe skeda e nji shkrimtari… | Radi and Radi”. radiandradi.com. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 

R-39 Rif

R-39

R-39

Type
Submarine-launched ballistic missile

Place of origin
Soviet Union

Service history

In service
1983–2004

Used by
Soviet Union / Russia

Production history

Designer
Makeyev Rocket Design Bureau

Manufacturer
Zlatoust Machine-Building Plant

Specifications

Weight
84 tonnes (185,000 lb)

Length
16.1 metres (53 ft)[1] (8.4 metres (28 ft) without warhead)

Diameter
2.4 metres (7.9 ft)[1]

Warhead
10[1]

Blast yield
100–200 kt each[1]

Engine
Three-stage Solid-fuel rocket[1]

Operational
range

8,300 kilometres (5,200 mi)[1]

Guidance
system

Astro-inertial guidance[2]

Submarine-based missiles: R-29, R-29Р, R-39, R-29РМ, CSS-NX-3, JL-2

The R-39 Rif (NATO reporting name: SS-NX-20 Sturgeon; bilateral arms control designation: RSM-52 ) was a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) that served with the Soviet Navy from its introduction in 1983 until 1991, after which it served with the Russian Navy until 2004. The missile had GRAU indices of 3M65, 3M20, and 3R65. It was carried on board Typhoon-class submarines.
An intercontinental missile, the R-39 had a three-stage solid-fuel boost design with a liquid-fuel post-boost unit carrying up to ten multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle warheads. Like other SLBMs the initial launch was powered by a gas generator in the bottom of the firing tube. During the missile’s passage through the water additional motors produce a gaseous wall around the missile, reducing hydrodynamic resistance.[citation needed] The launch system was designated “D-19”.

Contents

1 Development
2 Operators
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Development[edit]
Development work began at NII Mashinostroyeniya in 1971 and the design gained official approval in 1973. Initial test flights from 1979 found problems in the solid-fuel boost engines, over half of the early flights failed. Later tests aboard a modified Typhoon-class submarine were more successful and deployment began in May 1983, with 20 missiles in each submarine. At full deployment, 120 missiles were deployed with 1,200 total warheads.
Under the terms of the START I and START II treaties, from 1996 a number of R-39 missiles were destroyed. Throughout the 1990s, Typhoon class submarines and the R-39 missiles they carried were gradually withdrawn from service. All the missiles were decommissioned by 2004 and all the Typhoon class submarines have been r
연예인야동

Vince Cross

Vince Cross

Personal information

Full name
Vince Cross

Date of birth
(1919-02-22)22 February 1919

Date of death
7 June 1994(1994-06-07) (aged 75)

Height / weight
184 cm / 89 kg

Playing career1

Years
Club
Games (Goals)

1943–45
North Melbourne
4 (0)

1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1945.

Vince Cross (22 February 1919 – 7 June 1994) was an Australian rules footballer who played with North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).[1]
Notes[edit]

^ Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim (2014). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers: every AFL/VFL player since 1897 (10th ed.). Seaford, Victoria: BAS Publishing. p. 194. ISBN 978-1-921496-32-5. 

External links[edit]

Vince Cross’s statistics from AFL Tables
Vince Cross’s profile from AustralianFootball.com

This Australian rules football biography of a person born in the 1910s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

한국야동

Currumbin, Queensland

“Currumbin” redirects here. For the Queensland electoral division, see Electoral district of Currumbin.

Currumbin
Gold Coast, Queensland

The Gold Coast skyline from Currumbin Beach

Population
2,785 (2011 census)[1]

Postcode(s)
4223

LGA(s)
City of Gold Coast

State electorate(s)
Currumbin

Federal Division(s)
McPherson [2]

Suburbs around Currumbin:

Elanora
Palm Beach
Pacific Ocean

Currumbin Waters
Currumbin
Pacific Ocean

Currumbin Waters
Currumbin Waters
Tugun

Currumbin is a coastal suburb in the Gold Coast region of Queensland, Australia. At the 2011 Census, Currumbin had a population of 2,785.[1] From 1947 onwards, the iconic Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary has been welcoming tourists.

Contents

1 History
2 Demographics
3 Heritage listings
4 Geography
5 Events
6 Sport and recreation
7 See also
8 References
9 External links

History[edit]
Samuel William Grey was the first European to acquire land in the area.[3] In 1904, Isle, Love and Co advertised the first subdivisions in Currumbin [4] The first hotel was built by Wallace McDonald Nicoll in 1910 on Duringan Street overlooking the mouth of the Currumbin Creek.[5] During this period tourism and industry significantly increased in the beach side and valley areas of Currumbin. Many of the houses at Currumbin date from the period of later subdivisions in the 1920s. The area also contains a number of fibro beach houses. Since then later development has occurred including some high rise backing onto the hillside at Pacific Parade.

Currumbin Beach, 1938

Generally the area contains more natural vegetation than other areas of the coast due in part to the difficulty of building on the steep hillsides and in part to the presence of the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary – a long-standing icon and landmark at the Gold Coast. The Sanctuary comprises a substantial area of land on both sides of the highway adjacent to Flat Rock Creek.
In 2013, Currumbin was named Australia’s cleanest beach. At an award ceremony at Coogee Beach WA the national organisation Keep Australia Beautiful crowned Currumbin with the prestigious title. Currumbin was commended in particular for its excellence in community involvement and partnerships.[6]
Demographics[edit]

Tomewin Street, 2015

In the 2011 census, Currumbin recorded a population of 2,785 people, 50.9% female and 49.1% male.[1] The median age of the Currumbin population was 41 years, 4 years above the national median of 37. 73.7% of p

It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It

Studio album by Mac Dre

Released
November 20, 2001 (U.S.)

Genre
West Coast Hip Hop, Hyphy, Gangsta Rap

Label
Thizz

Mac Dre chronology

Mac Dre’s the Name
(2000)
It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It
(2001)
Thizzelle Washington
(2002)

It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It is a 2001 album by Hyphy Bay Area rapper Mac Dre.
“Mac Dre’s It’s Not What You Say…It’s How You Say It is another collection of hardcore rap from the underground. Guest stars include Richie Rich, Keak da Sneak, and several others. Fans of his previous work will probably enjoy this just fine, while new listeners can at least get a glimpse into the underground West Coast scene.” ~ Bradley Torreano, Allmusic
Track listing[edit]

“The Wolf Intro” (featuring Dubee)[1]
“Have You Eva” (featuring Dee and Little Bruce)[1]
“Bleezies-n-Heem”[1]
“Sex, Drugs, Rap?” (featuring Freak-O, Moe Jack and Nutt Briddle)[1]
“Livin’ It”[1]
“So Hard”[1]
“Iz Real” (featuring Messy Marv)[1]
“Mac Dammit & Friends” (featuring B.A., Keak da Sneak and PSD)[1]
“Always Inta Somethin'” (featuring Da’ Unda’ Dogg, J-Diggs and Sleep Dank)[1]
“Chevs and Fords” (featuring Little Bruce)[1]
“Take Yo’ Panties Off” (featuring Vital) Produced by Lev Berlak[1]
“Mac Dre’vious”[1]
“Hold Off” (featuring Richie Rich)[1]
“Bonus Track” (featuring Shouman and Suga Free)[1]

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n “Mac Dre – It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It”. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 

v
t
e

Mac Dre

Studio albums

Young Black Brotha (1989)
Stupid Doo Doo Dumb (1998)
Rapper Gone Bad (1999)
Heart of a Gangsta, Mind of a Hustla, Tongue of a Pimp (2000)
Mac Dre’s the Name (2001)
It’s Not What You Say… It’s How You Say It (2001)
Thizzelle Washington (2002)
Ronald Dregan: Dreganomics (2004)
The Genie of the Lamp (2004)
The Game Is Thick, Vol. 2 (2004)
Dre Day: July 5th 1970 (2008)

EPs

Young Black Brotha (EP) (1989)
Back N Da Hood (1992)

Collaboration albums

15 Years Deep (with Da’unda’dogg) (2005)
16 Wit Dre (with DJ Backside) (2006)
16 Wit Dre, Vol. 2 (with DJ Backside) (2006)
A Tale of Two Andres (with Andre Nickatina) (2008)

Gre
춘자넷